All around the world, there grows an impressive array of mushrooms and fungi of all kinds. Over the centuries—even millennia—ancient cultures have made some startling discoveries about these fungi when it comes to their health properties.

Reishi, for example, is known to power up immunity and promote healthy aging. Cordyceps boosts physical energy in rather incredible ways, while lion’s mane is especially known to boost mental energy. All of these mushrooms and fungi have fantastic claims to fame, both in the past realms of traditional healing and today’s scientific research.

For those of us who live in America, however, all these mushrooms may seem exotic, distant, and fairly unavailable—which is somewhat true. Most of these fungi are local and native to Asian countries or the far north, though reishi (and even the reputable chaga) can be found in certain corners of North America.

But it may surprise that there does happen to be one mushroom that studies show number among the most amazing of medicinal mushrooms, and it grows right under our very noses.

Scientifically, it is called Trametes versicolor. In plain English, we call it the turkey tail mushroom.

TURKEY TAIL: THE HEALING MUSHROOM FROM OUR OWN WOODS

That’s right: turkey tail is an incredibly common mushroom, native to forests all around the world, including our own. All the same, it’s quite difficult to identify, with many woodland fungi being very close imitators of this colorful wild inhabitant, usually found growing on the logs and limbs of trees.

Obviously, the name of the mushroom has a lot to do with its appearance. It grows in a fan-like shape, showing many layers and rings of striking and contrasting colors—ranging from browns and tans to blues, creams, and even reds, making it look indeed quite like the tail of a wild turkey.

According to Josh Axe, renowned health expert, turkey tail has a history as rich and colorful as its appearance, especially in Asia. “…turkey tail mushrooms have been brewed for thousands of years by the Chinese as medicinal teas,” said Axe in his article.

“It’s been used as early as the 15th century during the Ming Dynasty in China,” he continued. “The Japanese, who reference it as kawaritake or ‘cloud mushrooms’…have been well aware of [its] benefits…in fact, the cloud-like image symbolizes ‘longevity and health, spiritual attunement and infinity’ to these Asian cultures.”

THE HISTORY OF ITS HEALING USE

Is it any coincidence that Asian herbalists dubbed turkey tail a symbol of health, longevity, and infinity? Hardly.

The mythos of this fungus’s cloud-like, heavenly appearance may actually be connected to its actual uses in ancient herbalism, and not just its symbolism. In Asia, records show it was used as both a food and medicine to strengthen the body and overall health.

Truth be told, however, turkey tail very likely was used for health and healing all over the world, since the mushroom is known to grow just about anywhere. This includes in traditional European herbal healing, different First Nation herbal traditions, and many others.

While there isn’t much public history on what cultures outside of Asia used turkey tail for, today’s scientific forays into medicinal mushroom research suggest it may all basically involve turkey tail’s most well-researched benefit of all: its immune-boosting capabilities.

Back in the day, an immune-strengthening herb or mushroom could be translated as a tonic or even an adaptogen: something that reinforced health everywhere in the body and protecting it against illnesses of all kinds.

WHAT DOES SCIENCE SAY ABOUT IT TODAY?

Do turkey tail’s benefits translate back clearly enough through today’s scientific lens, however? Apparently, yes, they do—and possibly much better than any other anciently used medicinal mushroom that has been researched thus far today.

As of today, there are far more studies and research confirming turkey tail as being unbelievably good at what it has always done in ancient herbalist tradition: empowering immunity, and thus, overall health by protecting the body from various diseases.

In non-scientific terms, turkey tail’s benefits sound quite simple. But take a closer look, and there are many more facets and layers to what it can do—each just as unique and striking as the colors in its appearance.

TURKEY TAIL HAS AMAZING IMMUNE BENEFITS

As stated before, turkey tail is perhaps best known for being an immune mushroom. Like other mushrooms that help ramp up immunity, turkey tail contains polysaccharides which help it do the trick—though research also shows it has something a little more unique than all that.

A 2011 study on turkey tail found that it also contained a unique protein, called TVC, that both stimulated the immune system and modulated its response. This could possibly make it a great agent for protecting against illness, while also being great for controlling the immune system from harming itself, as in the case of autoimmune illnesses (like rheumatoid arthritis).

Turkey tail’s immune-protecting benefits may be so great, it could even be a potential antiviral treatment to combat and treat AIDS or HIV. Turkey tail was mentioned with many other mushrooms—like reishi and maitake—in a 2011 study where HIV-infected subjects took these mushrooms, and experienced immune benefits comparable to mainstream HIV anti-viral drugs.

For any illness—serious or minor—turkey tail could be a marvelous ally to help revitalize weakened immune systems, and assist the body with fighting off foreign invaders, from HIV infections all the way to the common cold. Research is quite hopeful today, though still, more studies are needed.

TURKEY TAIL COULD PROTECT AGAINST CANCER

One of the most devastating and serious diseases of all time, cancer, could also find a formidable enemy in the humble but vibrant turkey tail mushroom.

A study in 2012 found that women subjects with breast cancer who took turkey tail mushroom supplements experienced their immune systems springing back to life following cancer treatments, a time when patients tend to have compromised and weakened immune systems.

A study in 2013, a year later, found that turkey tail could also possibly stop the spreading cancer cells in gastric tissues, thereby reducing the risk of gastrointestinal cancers of many kinds. This includes intestinal cancer, stomach cancer, colon cancer, liver cancer, esophageal cancer, rectal cancer, gallbladder cancer, and many other kinds of cancers related to the digestive system besides.

Could taking turkey tail every day minimize the chances of getting cancer? Though more research is inevitably needed to make this a factual statement, thus far studies suggest that the outlook on this mushroom’s anti-cancer benefits are quite good.

TURKEY TAIL HAS ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY

In a 2012 review, turkey tail was listed with many other medicinal mushrooms as being antioxidant-rich. No doubt, the fungus’s antioxidant content has quite a bit to do with its cancer-fighting, immune-boosting capabilities.

This antioxidant potential can be owed once again to turkey tail’s proteins and polysaccharides, both compounds that are similarly found in other renowned mushrooms in the health world. Such antioxidant content makes this fungus also have effects comparable to certain antioxidant-rich herbs, such as cistanche, schisandra, or burdock.

Because antioxidants help slow the processes of cellular oxidation, this could make turkey tail a great natural supplement to help soften the undesired effects of aging, while reducing inflammation and the risk of certain diseases—such as heart disease, diabetes, or digestive illnesses.

Since chronic inflammation caused by free radicals can also take a heavy toll on the nervous system, turkey tail may also be a helpful tonic to nervous system issues in some ways in the long-term, such as anxiety, stress and depression.

TURKEY TAIL COULD HEAL THE DIGESTIVE TRACT

What more is turkey tail good for? According to some recent studies, it could be an amazing healer for the gut and digestive system, in addition to all else it can do.

A 2014 study showed that turkey tail was a very successful prebiotic that could reduce the chances of digestive inflammation—another stepping stone to reducing cancer risk in the gut. Prebiotics are natural foods that help replenish the gut with probiotics and beneficial microflora, which is one of the major functions of dietary fiber—a macronutrient turkey tail happens to contain.

As such, taking turkey tail often—and in the right amounts—could be helpful to taking care of one’s gut microbiome, which has benefits for the digestive system and beyond.

Feeding probiotics with prebiotics (such as turkey tail) could improve the absorption of other nutrients—like vitamin B12, vitamin D, and some minerals—while also reducing the risk of digestive illnesses like IBS, Crohn’s disease, colitis, and many other well-known gut imbalances to boot.

TURKEY TAIL HAS ASTOUNDING DETOX POTENTIAL

Perhaps one of the most startling things of all: more than any other mushroom, turkey tail has demonstrated the most hope in helping the body detoxify itself.

The way it accomplishes this fascinating feat? By benefitting the liver particularly, the body’s most important detoxifying organ. A 2010 study observed the mushroom killing off tumor cells that had made their way into the liver, suggesting that turkey tail could be a strong companion to the liver’s own detox capabilities.

Two more studies came along, one in 2011 and one in 2012, showing that its antioxidants were so strong they could help shield the liver from the harmful effects of radiation following cancer treatments. If liver health is a major concern—or if one is in pursuit of a scientifically-supported detox regimen—turkey tail may just be one of the best botanicals to seek out, along with a few others.

FIND TURKEY TAIL WITH OTHER HERBS IN LVR-RENEW

LVR-RENEW is one of our latest formulated herbal supplements, and we’ve chosen each individual herb with the idea of liver health in mind. Turkey tail is one of the top botanicals we’ve chosen and added to our formula, but there is a whole lot more to try in this carefully hand-picked blend.

  • Milk thistle seed – Myriad studies show this plant encourages the liver to grow new cells and heal damaged ones, therefore helping detox
  • Reishi mushroom – Like turkey tail, reishi is another mushroom scientifically shown to reduce the chance of liver damage and encourage healing
  • Poria mushroom – Best known for its use in Traditional Chinese Medicine, this fungus was classically used as a liver-qi tonic – supported by science
  • Schisandra berry – An antioxidant that will help reduce the risk of damage to the liver, helping it with its detoxification – more studies needed
  • Dandelion root – A common weed that holds amazing liver potential, both a favored liver tonic in western herbalism and supported by studies
  • Licorice root – Boosts immunity and also has shown positive effects on the liver in studies – speeds healing and recovery in liver cells when damaged

Get Social – Like, Comment and Share:

RESEARCH
Feng Li, HuaAn Wen, YongJie Zhang, MinAa, XingZhong Liu (2011). Purification and characterization of a novel immunomodulatory protein from the medicinal mushroom Trametes versicolor. Science China Life Sciences 54(4) 379-385. Retrieved from https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11427-011-4153-2?LI=true
Gideon Adotey, Abraham Quarcoo, John C. Holliday, Solomon Fofie, Braimah Saaka (2011). Effect of Immunomodulating and Antiviral Agent of Medicinal Mushrooms (Immune Assist 24/7™) on CD4+ T-Lymphocyte Counts of HIV-Infected Patients. International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms 13(2) 109-113. Retrieved from http://www.dl.begellhouse.com/journals/708ae68d64b17c52,31e1791e300b7e1e,565912657940cd12.html
C.J. Torkelson, E. Sweet, M.R. Martzen, M. Sasagawa, C.A. Wenner, J. Gay, A. Putiri, L.J. Standish (2012). Phase 1 Clinical Trial of Trametes versicolor in Women with Breast Cancer. ISRN Oncology Vol. 2012 1-7. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22701186
Qiaoyin Zhang, Nianyu Huang, Junzhi Wang, Huajun Luo, Haibo He, Mingruo Ding, Wei-Qiao Deng, Kun Zou (2013). The H+/K+-ATPase inhibitory activities of Trametenolic acid B from Trametes lactinea (Berk.) Pat, and its effects on gastric cancer cells. Fitoterapia Vol. 89 210-217. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0367326X1300141X
Kumar Pallav, Scot E. Dowd, Javier Villafuerte, Xiaotong Yang, Toufic Kabbani, Joshua Hansen (2014). Effects of polysaccharopeptide from Trametes Versicolor and amoxicillin on the gut microbiome of healthy volunteers. Gut Microbes 5(4) 458-467. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.4161/gmic.29558#
Jose M. Santos Arteiro, M. Rosario Martins, Catia Salvador, M. Fatima Candeias, Amin Karmali, A. Teresa Caldeira (2012). Protein—polysaccharides of Trametes versicolor: production and biological activities. Medicinal Chemistry Research 21(6) 937-943. Retrieved from https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00044-011-9604-6
Maja Kozarski, Anita Klaus, Miomir Niksic, Miroslav M. Vrvic, Nina Todorovic, Dragica Jakovljevic, Leo J.L.D. Van Griensven (2012). Antioxidant activities and chemical characterization of polysaccharide extracts from the widely used mushrooms Ganoderma applanatum, Ganoderma lucidum, Lentinus edodes and Trametes versicolor. Journal of Food Composition and Analysis 26(1-2) 144-153. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0889157512000245
Xinzhong Cai, Yan Pi, Xin Zhou, Lifen Tian, Shouyi Qiao, Juan Lin (2010). Hepatoma Cell Growth Inhibition by Inducing Apoptosis with Polysaccharide Isolated from Turkey Tail Medicinal Mushroom, Trametes versicolor (L.: Fr.) Lloyd (Aphyllophoromycetideae). International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms 12(3) 257-263. Retrieved from http://www.dl.begellhouse.com/journals/708ae68d64b17c52,2da9c44d295f30f8,7f28c3fe35084a57.html
John H.K. Yeung, Penelope M.Y. Or (2011). Polysaccharide peptides from Coriolus versicolor competitively inhibit tolbutamide 4-hydroxylation in specific human CYP2C9 isoform and polled human liver microsomes. Phytomedicine 18(13) 1170-1175. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0944711311001875
John H.K. Yeung, Penelope M.Y. Or (2012). Polysaccharide peptides from Coriolus versicolor competitively inhibit model cytochrome P450 enzyme probe substrates metabolism in human liver microsomes. Phytomedicine 19(5) 457-463. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0944711311004855