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Neuro Regen: Neurological & Nerve Support*

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Product Description

A Natural Way to Strengthen Nerves and the Nervous System*

How Neuro Regen May Help:

  • Helps with natural nerve growth in the body*
  • Helps to repair and protect established nerves*
  • Helps strengthen the body’s entire nervous system*
  • Helps relieve neuropathic pain*
  • Helps to support better energy, focus, and mood*
  • Helps to reduce the risk of nerve-related conditions*

Formulated for Neurological & Nerve Support*

Each Ingredient Must Have Historical Use & Independent Studies!

Lion’s Mane (Hericeum erinaceus)
An unforgettable-looking mushroom that has garnered way too many animalistic titles to count, including deer’s tail, monkey head, and hedgehog mushroom.

Today, the name lion’s mane has stuck. It is one of the most-researched mushrooms in the world for its exciting potential to protect nerves, heal nerves, stimulate nerve re-growth, and reduce the risk of nerve-related conditions.Supporting Research 1–22

Epimedium (Epimedium spp.; Horny Goat Weed)
We include an herb that earned its captivating name by the kick of energy it would give livestock.

Humans, too, get a real energy boost from this invigorating plant and ancient medicine. Today, studies reveal and suggest that this has to do with its nerve regenerating and protective properties. Supporting Research 23–37

Mucuna pruriens (Velvet Bean)
In ancient times, this bean-like plant was remarkable for the way it made both people and animals itch when they came into contact with it.

Ancient healers long ago—in addition to scientists today—have found that this itchiness is owed to plant compounds that act similar to neurotransmitters, which in turn can help bring balance to nerves and the nervous system.Supporting Reseach 38–44

Sulforaphane
Arguably the healthiest benefits to eating kale, broccoli, and even kohlrabi are all due to some wondrous phytochemicals found in all these members of the Brassica family.

Known as sulforaphane, these compounds are considerably powerful antioxidants—so powerful that they could curb inflammation of nerves, which in turn may help the nerves and nervous system regenerate.Supporting Reseach 45–66

Neuro Regen also includes the addition of piperine, the active alkaloid chemical found in black pepper. It immediately increases the bioavailability of the powerful compounds in these mushrooms so that you can feel the difference!*

We Only Cultivate & Harvest The Purest Sourced Botanicals

Nerve Support & Repair No Matter How You Mix It!

What Customers Are Saying:

Average Score: 5 (3 ratings)
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A Product That Works

ok folks, I hardly leave any reviews about anything (less than 10 including this one), but I decided to do based on several devestating injuries along with medical complications since 2009. So I have invested much time and money (between illnusses & injuries) to recover, get well, blah blah, several things eirked and are wirking, the rest did not. I purchased first Neuro Shroom and started taking it per recommended dosage & noticed some slight changes very positive changes. several weeks after i had purchased this, I decided to purchase and add the Neuro Regen to my regimen. Now I have noticed a positive healing physical-mental-spiritual. Thank you for TRUSTWORTHY quality products, people (besides me) can depend on. I don’t have enough time to keep trying things over & over or wonder what is really in what I am taking for my progressive recovery. Thank you Primal Herb, your employees & all your source material for helping me and the planet. My review is unsolicated and I am not seeking compensation.

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Look no further 👌🏽

Real game changer. At the age of 36 I’m well versed in various types of nootropics and adaptogenic herbs. Over the past 10+ years I’ve sought effective tonics for longevity, mental acuity and optimal overall performance both in and out of the gym. Having used both lion’s mane and epimedium separately in the past, I’m happy to report that the synergy is quite amazing. Cheers!

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Helps with My Neuropathy

Thank you for such a great formula. I have noticed a significant improvement with my neuropathy. Thanks again!

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OUR PROCESS FROM START TO FINISH:

The Quality of Our Products, Knowledge, and Compassion Allows for The Perfect Experience.

We source Pure Raw Ingredients that are sustainably grown and harvested from around the world. Always making sure they’re free of chemical fertilizers and pesticides.

All of our mushroom formulas are from the mature fruiting bodies and a Dual Extraction Process: both water and alcohol extraction. This combination allows for the extraction of some of the most active and bioavailable compounds. In the extraction process, we use purified water and Non-GMO ethanol.

High-Quality Processing Includes:

  • Pretreatment: Cleaning and separating only this highest quality raw material.
  • Dual Extraction Process: both water and alcohol extraction. This process allows for the extraction of some of the most active and bioavailable compounds. In the extraction process, we use purified water and Non-GMO ethanol.
  • Filtration: Once the extraction process is complete we filter using a multiple pass filtration system, to ensure purity.
  • Concentrate: We then concentrate the extract to needed potency.
  • Drying: We spray dry without any heat to ensure no denigration of potency.
  • Sieving: We then run the dried extract powder through a sieving and meshing process to ensure the proper consistency of the texture.
  • Testing: Once complete the finished product is sent to our Quality Control Center in the US. Then on to fulfillment centers located throughout the US for prompt delivery.

Effective, All Natural – Plus a 1 Year Money Back Guarantee!

PLANT-BASED INGREDIENTS FOR NERVE STRENGTH & RECOVERY*

How does our Neuro-Regen formula accomplish all the amazing feats above?

That’s easy: through the careful selection of scientifically-supported herbs, plant-based ingredients, and fungi also used for their research-proven benefits over thousands of years.*

The natural world has a lot to offer in nerve and nervous system support—but we’ve decided to only choose among the very best botanicals to include in our blend.

Centuries (if not millennia) ago, ancestors of ours from all over the world discovered and tested the uses of many different herbs and fungi for their healing properties. Expert herbalists and healers of all kinds mastered their uses.

Looking at what they have discovered and accomplished, we’ve learned a lot about what specific plant-based ingredients, herbs, and mushrooms can do for the brain, nerves, neurons, and overall nervous system health.

Today, research and traditional use have together hand-in-hand narrowed the best botanical uses down to a select few species, each with impressive reputations both in their body and field of traditional use—and scientific studies to boot.

These include:

LION’S MANE (HERICEUM ERINACEUS)

None of our ingredients roar quite so loudly in the world of nerve recovery as the lordly lion’s mane. Along with other widely popular medicinal mushrooms like reishi and cordyceps, lion’s mane has been a go-to remedy in the practice of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM).

Originally, lion’s mane was a simple tonic that visibly improved overall health—though healers noticed it had an especially strong impact on the brain, nerves, mood, and much more.

Researchers today are noticing similar results. A 2017 review dubbed lion’s mane a neuroprotector and neuro-regenerative, meaning that it both helped protect and stimulate the growth of nerves and neurons.* It’s also shown great promise for reducing the risk of a wide range of neurological diseases.*

HORNY GOAT WEED (EPIMEDIUM SPP.)

Hearing the name of this herb is sure to intrigue. Scientifically known as epimedium, its more common names reveal more than enough about its benefits in the realm of energy, vitality, and the reproductive system.

But horny goat weed has another trick up its sleeve: it helps heal and protect nerves, much like lion’s mane does.

This, of course, accounts for some of its energizing properties. Yet studies have also shown that it could boost cognitive abilities, improve nervous motor function, and even help nerves grow back through neurogenesis.*

VELVET BEAN (MUCUNA PRURIENS)

Many of us may not recognize this herb in the Western world. It looks somewhat like a vanilla bean, though it’s unrelated to the culinary spice.

In Eastern and Asian healing practices, however, the reputation of the herb mucuna pruriens is only preceded by very few others.

What was once appreciated as a faultless nerve tonic now has science and research to back those claims and uses today.

More specifically: a 2014 review shows that the plant contains a precursor to dopamine, which is responsible for supporting mood and reducing one’s risk of Parkinson’s disease.* Another study in 2011 shows that the compounds in mucuna pruriens have such strong nerve powers, they could forestall seizures and epilepsy.*

SULFORAPHANE

Beyond the astounding nerve tonic potential hidden in a small handful of healing herbs, apparently, there is impressive healing potential to be found in our everyday plant foods as well.

Sulforaphane, compounds found in vegetables of the brassica family, are a great example of this.

These sulfur-like phytochemicals can be experienced when eating and enjoying veggies such as broccoli, kale, cauliflower, cabbage, radishes, turnips, mustard, kohlrabi, and many others besides.

What’s more, they have purported anti-inflammatory and antioxidant benefits.

So antioxidant, in fact, that in a 2011 review, sulforaphane was named a potential therapy for neurodegenerative diseases related to damaged nerves and neurons.*

A 2017 study also found that sulforaphane could help relieve neuropathic pain where mainstream medicine has failed to find a successful pain reliever for such conditions.*

THE SCIENCE OF THE NERVES AND NERVOUS SYSTEM

Why focus on the nerves and the nervous system? Why are they so important, and how (and why) do they play such an important role in health and wellness?

More importantly: what are nerves?

Making up the bulk and the majority of our nervous systems, nerves are basically bundles of cable-like tissues that branch out through practically every surface and organ of our bodies.

We need nerves to feel and sense pain, as well as many other sensations.

Nerves also transport certain messages between far-flung and distant areas of the body that need to communicate with one another.

Without them, the entire body would be disassociated, disconnected, and out-of-sync. Without sensation perception of pain, for example, the body would become damaged without any knowledge of when (or how) to protect itself and heal itself.

In short, nerves and the nervous system are the pathways between which we communicate with our own bodies.

Nerves let us know if we are experiencing too much pain or damage, or too much stress, depression, and anxiety. As a less obvious or known benefit, they are also great gauges for how much energy we have.

This is all the more reason to focus on and take care of the nervous system—including with the help of botanicals and other natural means.

WHY WOULD I NEED EXTRA NERVE SUPPORT?

When mixed all together, these favorite formula herbs for nerve support cover all the bases one could possibly imagine when working to strengthen the nervous system.

At their basic foundation, each herb, mushroom, or plant-based ingredient supports the nerves and neurons, old and new.

Branching out from these benefits, however, there’s far more to Neuro Regen’s ingredients than meets the eye.

Why pursue better healthiness and support for the nervous system with the use of botanicals?

Some of the following reasons may convince.

TO IMPROVE MOOD

It’s one of the elemental basics of the nervous system: nerves tie into mood. The majority of us know that.

But this also has huge implications for dealing with mood states like stress, depression, and even anxiety.

And not just as simple mood states, but for the benefit of more major conditions as well.

Plenty of studies suggest that herbs that help regenerate the nerves and neurons can also have an enormous impact on moods and mood disorders, with herbs and fungi like lion’s mane and mucuna pruriens being great examples.

TO IMPROVE ENERGY

It may surprise some to hear that the well-being of the nervous system and nerves also has a strong connection to energy levels.

The central nervous system, for example—referring to the brain and spinal cord—is responsible for the creation and circulation of many neurotransmitters.

Serotonin, dopamine, and many others among these neurotransmitters govern the body’s energy levels in a variety of shocking ways.

When the nerves and nervous system suffer or get out of whack, there’s a sure bet that energy levels will be impacted or involved.

Investigating the help and support of various botanicals and plant-based ingredients to improve nerve health and the nervous system can have some interesting (and energizing) benefits, too.

TO IMPROVE MENTAL FOCUS, CONCENTRATION, AND MEMORY

Numbering among the most likely reasons someone may take interest in neuro-regenerative herbs is to experience cognition, focus, and memory-boosting effects—also known as nootropic effects.

One of the most immediate effects of trying neuro-boosting herbs is overall better brain function.

Strengthening the nerves and nervous system helps with all this, whether the brain is stressed or if one is experiencing a dip in cognitive function as a telltale sign of aging.

Healers of the past have caught onto this benefit, and even today, athletes and health experts can vouch for this link, too—which can be strengthened with the help of neuro-regenerative herbs.

TO SUPPORT OR REDUCE THE RISK OF NERVE-RELATED CONDITIONS

It might be the biggest benefit of nerve-supporting herbs of all.

Taking care of the nerves equates to a healthy nervous system and can also form a wellness shield against illnesses and disorders that are involved with or caused by nerve damage, imbalance, or other nerve-related factors.*

In addition to reducing risk, it can also form support for people already experiencing these imbalances.

When it’s broken down, that extends to a lot of possible disorders or risks.*

These include:

SIGNS NEURO REGEN COULD BE HELPFUL

Far beyond looking to these ingredients for specific nerve support, there are a few not-so-obvious—and in fact subtle—signs that one’s nervous system could need a little boost.

In such instances, some of the ingredients in this powerful formula might just come in handy.

Even if there’s no condition involved or of concern, the herbs, mushrooms, and plant-based phytochemicals can still be turned to for a little health boost.

This applies even if a person doesn’t have a diagnosed disorder, but is experiencing nerve-related challenges nonetheless.

They may be of very special potential support in the instances of the following:

  • Poor memory
  • Difficulty focusing
  • Nerve pain (including back pain)
  • Bad eyesight
  • Double vision
  • Weakness
  • Fatigue
  • Brain fog
  • Chronic headaches
  • Difficulty speaking, forming sentences, or formulating thoughts
  • Difficulty solving difficult problems or equations
  • Tingling or pain all over the body
  • Lack of coordination
  • Lack of motor skills
  • Sudden headaches
  • Headaches that change in nature suddenly or often
  • Trembling hands or other body parts
  • Slurred speech
  • Muscle hardness and rigidity
  • Loss of feeling in certain areas

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Pauletti A, Terrone G, Shekh-Ahmad T, et al. Targeting oxidative stress improves disease outcomes in a rat model of acquired epilepsy. Brain. 2017;140(7):1885-1899. [PubMed]
62.
McDonnell C, Leánez S, Pol O. The induction of the transcription factor Nrf2 enhances the antinociceptive effects of delta-opioid receptors in diabetic mice. PLoS One. 2017;12(7):e0180998. [PubMed]
63.
Sunkaria A, Bhardwaj S, Yadav A, Halder A, Sandhir R. Sulforaphane attenuates postnatal proteasome inhibition and improves spatial learning in adult mice. J Nutr Biochem. 2018;51:69-79. [PubMed]
64.
McDonnell C, Leánez S, Pol O. The Inhibitory Effects of Cobalt Protoporphyrin IX and Cannabinoid 2 Receptor Agonists in Type 2 Diabetic Mice. Int J Mol Sci. 2017;18(11). [PubMed]
65.
Arcidiacono P, Stabile A, Ragonese F, et al. Anticarcinogenic activities of sulforaphane are influenced by Nerve Growth Factor in human melanoma A375 cells. Food Chem Toxicol. 2018;113:154-161. [PubMed]
66.
Moustafa P, Abdelkader N, El A, El-Shabrawy O, Zaki H. Extracellular Matrix Remodeling and Modulation of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress by Sulforaphane in Experimental Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy. Inflammation. April 2018. [PubMed]
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Moustafa P, Abdelkader N, El A, El-Shabrawy O, Zaki H. Extracellular Matrix Remodeling and Modulation of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress by Sulforaphane in Experimental Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy. Inflammation. April 2018. [PubMed]

We Only Cultivate & Harvest The Purest Sourced Botanicals

How and When To Use Neuro Regen

  • Add 1/2 tsp to hot water, coffee, tea, or smoothie.
  • Neuro Regen can be taken day or night – with or without food, so enjoy!
  • We recommend once daily, but it’s important to listen to your body and make adjustments!

What Customers Are Saying:

Average Score: 5 (3 ratings)
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A Product That Works

ok folks, I hardly leave any reviews about anything (less than 10 including this one), but I decided to do based on several devestating injuries along with medical complications since 2009. So I have invested much time and money (between illnusses & injuries) to recover, get well, blah blah, several things eirked and are wirking, the rest did not. I purchased first Neuro Shroom and started taking it per recommended dosage & noticed some slight changes very positive changes. several weeks after i had purchased this, I decided to purchase and add the Neuro Regen to my regimen. Now I have noticed a positive healing physical-mental-spiritual. Thank you for TRUSTWORTHY quality products, people (besides me) can depend on. I don’t have enough time to keep trying things over & over or wonder what is really in what I am taking for my progressive recovery. Thank you Primal Herb, your employees & all your source material for helping me and the planet. My review is unsolicated and I am not seeking compensation.

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Look no further 👌🏽

Real game changer. At the age of 36 I’m well versed in various types of nootropics and adaptogenic herbs. Over the past 10+ years I’ve sought effective tonics for longevity, mental acuity and optimal overall performance both in and out of the gym. Having used both lion’s mane and epimedium separately in the past, I’m happy to report that the synergy is quite amazing. Cheers!

0
2
Was this review helpful?
Helps with My Neuropathy

Thank you for such a great formula. I have noticed a significant improvement with my neuropathy. Thanks again!

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Reviews

Average Score: 5 (3 ratings)
5
3
4
0
3
0
2
0
1
0
Look no further 👌🏽

Real game changer. At the age of 36 I’m well versed in various types of nootropics and adaptogenic herbs. Over the past 10+ years I’ve sought effective tonics for longevity, mental acuity and optimal overall performance both in and out of the gym. Having used both lion’s mane and epimedium separately in the past, I’m happy to report that the synergy is quite amazing. Cheers!

0
2
Was this review helpful?
A Product That Works

ok folks, I hardly leave any reviews about anything (less than 10 including this one), but I decided to do based on several devestating injuries along with medical complications since 2009. So I have invested much time and money (between illnusses & injuries) to recover, get well, blah blah, several things eirked and are wirking, the rest did not. I purchased first Neuro Shroom and started taking it per recommended dosage & noticed some slight changes very positive changes. several weeks after i had purchased this, I decided to purchase and add the Neuro Regen to my regimen. Now I have noticed a positive healing physical-mental-spiritual. Thank you for TRUSTWORTHY quality products, people (besides me) can depend on. I don’t have enough time to keep trying things over & over or wonder what is really in what I am taking for my progressive recovery. Thank you Primal Herb, your employees & all your source material for helping me and the planet. My review is unsolicated and I am not seeking compensation.

0
0
Was this review helpful?
Helps with My Neuropathy

Thank you for such a great formula. I have noticed a significant improvement with my neuropathy. Thanks again!

0
14
Was this review helpful?

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